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MEET OUR LISTENING POST COLLECTIVE MEMBERS

The Listening Post Collective is a vibrant and collaborative network of partners across the US. The Listening Post team focuses on two things.

Supporting our members

We help establish projects and mentor local media working in communities that have news and information gaps. We provide funding, help conduct local research, and offer project support and coaching to local actors who seek to expand their community’s voice in media and make sure residents are better informed.

Sharing and learning

Through our playbook, newsletters and our toolkit, we share our strategies with a community of reporting outlets, journalism schools, and engaged journalism projects around the US. We also seek to learn from that same cohort, and collaboratively explore sustainability, reach, representation, and impact of local journalism.

Meet members of the LPC Collective below:

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HOW CAN WE HELP YOU?

Interested in conducting an Information Ecosystem Assessment in your community?

Want to host an engagement workshop for your newsroom or need mentoring for an ongoing project?

Read more about our LPC menu of services here Outgoing white cb73f2b9f059c3509e83d01815c961ed06c1860a3eff5a99a48c58cf122094af Outgoing hover 8daf58e64074432b5631b8f94f35939fb431b4aa437a49781cf585c3396aea3d

Learn more about Listening Post Collective Members below:

Location

Sonoma, CA

Focus

During the wildfires in Northern California in 2017, the inability to access timely, accurate information in Spanish caused fear and uncertainty – exacerbating the already fearful and dangerous situations caused by the fires. “The fear I felt from not speaking English is something I had never felt before,” said one Santa Rosa resident. Among the many consequences, many residents did not seek help at shelters and crisis centers because they either didn’t know about them, they didn’t trust them, or they were fearful of ICE being present. As such, many slept in their cars in fields, or near the beach, because they didn’t know where else to go. “Due to my lack of English, things got complicated and I did not know who or what to rely on,” said a Sonoma resident.


These were some of the findings in “Desconectado: How Emergency Information Got Lost in Translation During the Northern California Wildfires,” the information assessment that the Listening Post Collective conducted in response in 2018.


The goal of this assessment is to understand the challenges the Spanish-speaking population faced in accessing information during the fires, reasons for the lack of information in Spanish, and consequences of not having information in one’s primary language. It also offers some insights and suggestions for how to address this issue, to both continue recovery from the 2017 wildfire season, and to prepare for future disasters.


The assessment itself was informed by • 256 survey respondents • 41 Listening Circle attendees • 75+ community dinner guests • 30+ attendees to our panel at the 2018 COAD conference • Leaders of 26 community-based organizations • 15 stakeholders contributing to the disaster guide, who were able to give their voice and expertise • 100+ local government offices/agencies, non-profit and faith-based groups, wineries, public information officers and service clubs who received the disaster guide.


As a result of this assessment, the Listening Post Collective then invested in several local initiatives and partnerships to fill these gaps, including local Spanish-language bilingual radio station KBBF, and the NPR affiliate KRCB, as well as a number of key community organizations, including the Community Organizations Active in Disaster (COAD) of Napa Valley. We also partnered with California Hope, Calistoga Farmworkers Housing, Corazon Healdsburg, Community Health Initiative, Graton Day Labor Center, La Luz, On the Move, Santa Rosa Junior College and UpValley Family Centers.


Location

Sonoma, CA

Focus

During the wildfires in Northern California in 2017, the inability to access timely, accurate information in Spanish caused fear and uncertainty – exacerbating the already fearful and dangerous situations caused by the fires. “The fear I felt from not speaking English is something I had never felt before,” said one Santa Rosa resident. Among the many consequences, many residents did not seek help at shelters and crisis centers because they either didn’t know about them, they didn’t trust them, or they were fearful of ICE being present. As such, many slept in their cars in fields, or near the beach, because they didn’t know where else to go. “Due to my lack of English, things got complicated and I did not know who or what to rely on,” said a Sonoma resident.


These were some of the findings in “Desconectado: How Emergency Information Got Lost in Translation During the Northern California Wildfires,” the information assessment that the Listening Post Collective conducted in response in 2018.


The goal of this assessment is to understand the challenges the Spanish-speaking population faced in accessing information during the fires, reasons for the lack of information in Spanish, and consequences of not having information in one’s primary language. It also offers some insights and suggestions for how to address this issue, to both continue recovery from the 2017 wildfire season, and to prepare for future disasters.


The assessment itself was informed by • 256 survey respondents • 41 Listening Circle attendees • 75+ community dinner guests • 30+ attendees to our panel at the 2018 COAD conference • Leaders of 26 community-based organizations • 15 stakeholders contributing to the disaster guide, who were able to give their voice and expertise • 100+ local government offices/agencies, non-profit and faith-based groups, wineries, public information officers and service clubs who received the disaster guide.


As a result of this assessment, the Listening Post Collective then invested in several local initiatives and partnerships to fill these gaps, including local Spanish-language bilingual radio station KBBF, and the NPR affiliate KRCB, as well as a number of key community organizations, including the Community Organizations Active in Disaster (COAD) of Napa Valley. We also partnered with California Hope, Calistoga Farmworkers Housing, Corazon Healdsburg, Community Health Initiative, Graton Day Labor Center, La Luz, On the Move, Santa Rosa Junior College and UpValley Family Centers.


Supporters & Partners

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